Home
A Norumbega Almanac

 

Reference Page

 
 Quick Links  Annotated Links
The links in this column are the same as in the next, but without annotation, for quick navigation.

  Reference

  • Meteorological Conversions
  • Metric-English Conversions
  • Fraction-Decimal Conversion
  • How To Use A Compass
  • AMS Glossary
  • U.S. Topo Maps
  • World Civil Maps
  • Wikipedia
  • Information Please Almanac
  • How Stuff Works
  • Everyday Mysteries
  • How Government Works

  • Reference

  • Meteorological Conversions
    Calculators for
  • Temperature (Fahrenheit to Celsius to Kelvin)
  • Wind Chill
  • Heat Index
  • Wind Speed (Miles/hour to kilometers/hour to meters/second to knots
  • Relative Humidity
  • Barometric Pressure (millibars to inches to millimeters)

  • Metric-English Conversions
    Calculators for
  • Area
  • Stress
  • Speed
  • Distance
  • Temperature
  • Length/Height
  • Time
  • Volume
  • Power
  • Weight
  • Pressure
  • Fractions to Decimals

  • Fraction-Decimal Conversion
    Table of the most common fraction to decimal conversions, down to 32nds.

  • How To Use A Compass
    The author teaches the use of the orienteering compass, which has been standard among professional surveyors, long-distance hikers, and even urban naturalists for more than half a century. It is the kind we personally use. The knowledge gained from reading these tutorials could even save your life.
    Note: A slightly confusing note on the page informs the reader that the pages have moved, but it's a reference to the home page, which links to this one. Read the introductory notes, by all means, but the tutorial links are to be found down about midpage.

  • American Meteorological Society Glossary
    Forty-one years ago, the AMS published the Glossary of Meteorology. Containing 7900 terms, more than 10,000 copies have been sold over four decades through five printings. It is a tribute to the editors of the first edition that it has withstood the test of time and continued to be among the leading reference sources in meteorology and related sciences. This is the electronic version of the second edition of the Glossary with more than 12,000 terms. Along with the print version it should be the authoritative source for definitions of meteorological terms for many years to come.

  • U.S. Topo Maps
    U.S. Geological Survey topographical maps and aerial photos. Requires a little patience, but the effort is rewarded.

  • World Civil Maps
    Select "Find A Map" for detailed maps of North America and Europe, or see the world with topographic maps of places around the globe.

  • Information Please Almanac
    A mini-encyclopedia online for quick data reference.

  • Wikipedia
    Wikipedia is written collaboratively by volunteers from all around the world. There are more than 75,000 active contributors working on some 9,000,000 articles in more than 250 languages. Visitors do not need specialized qualifications to contribute, since their primary role is to write articles that cover existing knowledge; this means that people of all ages and cultural and social backgrounds can write Wikipedia articles. Because Wikipedia is an ongoing work to which, in principle, anybody can contribute, older articles tend to be more comprehensive and balanced, while newer articles more frequently contain significant misinformation, unencyclopedic content, or vandalism. Users need to be aware of this to obtain valid information and avoid misinformation that has been recently added and not yet removed (see Researching with Wikipedia for more details).

  • How Stuff Works
    How various things work, from hurricanes to microwaves to your own heart.

  • Everyday Mysteries
    All of the questions presented on this Web site were asked by researchers and answered by librarians from the Library of Congress Science Reference Services. These questions deal with everyday phenomena that we often take for granted, but each can be explained scientifically. Searchable and browsable.

  • How Government Works
    This link takes you to the Project Vote Smart homepage. We posted this link in 2003, after goons in the U.S. government suggested that people carrying almanacs should be considered possible suspects of terrorism. We have left the link, because we share the Project's view that the electorate rules best that is informed most. This is the most objective and trustworthy source of information about the "who," "what," and "how" of government from the federal to the local level that we've found anywhere on the 'net.

  • The original material on this site is copyright © 2003 - 2011 by Colby Quid. All rights reserved.
    The information on this site is for informational and educational purposes only. No warranties are made express or implied about the accuracy, timeliness, merit, or value of the information provided, and the editor shall not be held liable for any losses caused by reliance on the accuracy, reliability or timeliness of such information. Portions of the information may be incorrect or not current. Any person or entity that relies on any information obtained from this site does so at his or her own risk. No responsibility is assumed for any problems associated with the use of products, services or commercial information mentioned in this web site. No endorsement of products or companies is intended, nor is criticism of unnamed products or companies implied.